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onewayroad

onewayroad

“Dying is not a crime.” ― Jack Kevorkian
Oct 4, 2018
358
Hi all. Here is a thread to post your favorite art work. Doesn't have to be suicide themed, it's just that most of my favorite art is quite dark.

First up is my profile picture, Sorrowful old man by Van Gogh
1479806660496.jpg

Next we have Adrift by Jeremy Lipking.
23596493_144233722892613_3759296840244133888_n.jpg

Last we have The wedding party by Aron Wiesenfeld.
1479808841001.jpg



Please share some of your favorite art!
 
ParamitePie

ParamitePie

Experienced
Oct 11, 2018
218
The Lady of Shalott - John William Waterhouse.jpg
I'm only going to upload one, because I could turn this thread into a gallery and that would be unseemly. I've chosen John William Waterhouse's 'The Lady of Shalott', as I'm both fond of the artist and the story. I adore Tennyson's interpretation of the otherwise obscure figure of Arthurian legend. She was a figure who was trapped in a tower and cursed to observe the world through a mirror, for if she looked at Camelot directly, she would die. As a result, she was a despairing, lonesome soul whose heart longed for a life outside of her tower. She was made to observe the entire kingdom, making wondrous tapestries of all she saw, depicting things she'd never enjoy herself; love, companionship, freedom, and so forth. One day, she dared to look at Camelot and was struck by her curse. Knowing that she would die the next day, she ran away from her prison and boarded a boat. The morning after, she was found dead, frozen on the boat adrift down a river. To quote Part IV of Tennyson's poem:

And down the river's dim expanse
Like some bold seer in a trance,
Seeing all his own mischance
With glassy countenance
Did she look to Camelot.
And at the closing of the day
She loosed the chain, and down she lay;
The broad stream bore her far away,
The Lady of Shalott.

Lying, robed in snowy white
That loosely flew to left and right –
The leaves upon her falling light –
Thro' the noises of the night
She floated down to Camelot:
And as the boat-head wound along
The willowy hills and fields among,
They heard her singing her last song,
The Lady of Shalott.

Heard a carol, mournful, holy,
Chanted loudly, chanted lowly,
Till her blood was frozen slowly,
And her eyes were darken'd wholly,
Turn'd to tower'd Camelot;
For ere she reach'd upon the tide
The first house by the water-side,
Singing in her song she died,
The Lady of Shalott.

Under tower and balcony,
By garden-wall and gallery,
A gleaming shape she floated by,
A corse between the houses high,
Silent into Camelot.
Out upon the wharfs they came,
Knight and burgher, lord and dame,
And round the prow they read her name,
The Lady of Shalott.

 
Last edited:
onewayroad

onewayroad

“Dying is not a crime.” ― Jack Kevorkian
Oct 4, 2018
358
View attachment 2120
I'm only going to upload one, because I could turn this thread into a gallery and that would be unseemly. I've chosen John William Waterhouse's 'The Lady of Shalott', as I'm both fond of the artist and the story. I adore Tennyson's interpretation of the otherwise byzantine figure of Arthurian legend. She was a figure who was trapped in a tower and cursed to observe the world through a mirror, for if she looked at Camelot directly, she would die. As a result, she was a despairing, lonesome soul whose heart longed for a life outside of her tower. She was made to observe the entire kingdom, making wondrous tapestries of all she saw, depicting things she'd never enjoy herself; love, companionship, freedom, and so forth. One day, she dared to look at Camelot and was struck by her curse. Knowing that she would die the next day, she ran away from her prison and boarded a boat. The morning after, she was found dead, frozen on the boat adrift down a river. To quote Part IV of Tennyson's poem:

And down the river's dim expanse
Like some bold seer in a trance,
Seeing all his own mischance
With glassy countenance
Did she look to Camelot.
And at the closing of the day
She loosed the chain, and down she lay;
The broad stream bore her far away,
The Lady of Shalott.

Lying, robed in snowy white
That loosely flew to left and right –
The leaves upon her falling light –
Thro' the noises of the night
She floated down to Camelot:
And as the boat-head wound along
The willowy hills and fields among,
They heard her singing her last song,
The Lady of Shalott.

Heard a carol, mournful, holy,
Chanted loudly, chanted lowly,
Till her blood was frozen slowly,
And her eyes were darken'd wholly,
Turn'd to tower'd Camelot;
For ere she reach'd upon the tide
The first house by the water-side,
Singing in her song she died,
The Lady of Shalott.

Under tower and balcony,
By garden-wall and gallery,
A gleaming shape she floated by,
A corse between the houses high,
Silent into Camelot.
Out upon the wharfs they came,
Knight and burgher, lord and dame,
And round the prow they read her name,
The Lady of Shalott.


Simply beautiful.
 
S

Schopenhauer

Enlightened
Oct 3, 2018
1,136
This is how the world feels to me:

The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_by_Bosch_High_Resolution.jpg
 
onewayroad

onewayroad

“Dying is not a crime.” ― Jack Kevorkian
Oct 4, 2018
358
This is how the world feels to me:

The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_by_Bosch_High_Resolution.jpg

Ah yes, Hieronymus Bosch. What a deranged individual, the Garden of Earthly Delights is incredible indeed. Ah holy smokes that's a high resolution version of it! Right click on it and open that baby up in a new tab to see all the detail. Have you seen the exterior panels when it's closed? I like them too.
Hieronymus_Bosch_-_The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_-_The_exterior_%28shutters%29.jpg



The amount of work that must have gone into this is crazy. Really good.
 
Gainax

Gainax

Experienced
Oct 8, 2018
266
fm-Zbs32c11-VGi3-Zc-ZY5-WOQwo-Mr-PRcqz2-Ax5-Mb-APBNh4.jpg


Anguish', Friedrich Albrecht Schenck, oil on canvas, 1878

In Anguish, Schenck has given his distraught ewe an expression suggestive of despair mingled with stoic determination. Recognizing these decidedly human responses, the viewer might be expected to identify immediately with the animal’s grim predicament. The ewe’s bravery in the face of the threat posed by the murderous circle of crows is perhaps, however, somewhat overstated in her defiant stance above the bleeding lamb.
 
RM5998

RM5998

Sack of Meat
Sep 3, 2018
2,206
I've had very little exposure to artwork by great painters, but I've seen a lot of the stuff my dad painted (some of it hangs around our house, and I'd take photos of that if I was at home). Of the little I am familiar with, Dali's always been a fascinating painter for me, and while I'd hate to be clichéd, this painting does make me stare intently and every time I look at it.

W1siZiIsIjM4NjQ3MCJdLFsicCIsImNvbnZlcnQiLCItcmVzaXplIDIwMDB4MjAwMFx1MDAzZSJdXQ.jpg

The Persistence of Memory by Salvador Dali (1931).

I also like this one:

SD049-Salvador-Dali-the-elephants-filler-artwork-1000x1000.jpg


The Elephants, Salvador Dali (1948).
 
ManWithNoName

ManWithNoName

Enlightened
Feb 2, 2019
1,065
I enjoyed seeing the painting through its process:

 
ManWithNoName

ManWithNoName

Enlightened
Feb 2, 2019
1,065
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