ecmnesia

ecmnesia

the only thing humans are equal in is death
Aug 30, 2020
767
basically, I have issues to open up and there are many delicate issues (like self-harm, suicide, sexual abuse, parents abuse) that I don't know how to introduce. I'm deeply ashamed to talk about my feelings and all those stuff. Plus I don't want to be judged (I'm too self-conscious for my own good) or face a consequence like involuntary hospitalization.
I've been to the psychiatrist before, been on meds for 6 months or something, but we don't really talk, so I didn't have to face this.
I don't know how to explain it but I'm scared and want to give up (just like I've been doing for the last 11 years). Can anyone help me by sharing their knowledge on the matter? Like... what should I expect? Is there something I shouldn't talk about?
Sorry for the rant, thanks for reading.
 
L

L-L

-
Nov 14, 2019
128
Hey ecmnesia. In my experience the quality of an interaction depends entirely upon the psychiatrist as an individual. I've seen some who are absolutely brilliant, and others who have been terrible and almost dismissive.

Don't forget that they are there to help you. If you want to, when they say hello and how are you, tell them how you're nervous and worried.

In terms of being concerned about bringing your issues up: try not to be. The chances are that they've treated people who share similarities to yourself. If they judge? Fuck em.

Expect it to be uncomfortable - more because you're nervous than it actually being awkward. They will ask you some questions about yourself which might be unpleasant, too. Chances are this will be towards the start of your appointment because they'll be trying to get a handle on what they're dealing with, too.

Bottom line is: you'll be fine. Unless they deem you to be at immediate risk, they'll have no grounds to attempt to section you. You talk about what you want to talk about and see how it goes.

Good luck!
 
VIBRITANNIA

VIBRITANNIA

lelouch. any pronouns. pfp is by pixiv id 3217872.
Aug 10, 2020
1,156
you don't have to share everything in the first session.

telling your therapist you have issues talking about your feelings and trauma would be a good first step. they could help you work through that first, so eventually you could get to a point where talking about your feelings and trauma isn't as distressing.

as for the consequences of talking about certain things... where i live, you'll only receive a consequence like hospitalization if your therapist thinks you're in danger of hurting yourself or others. what qualifies as danger varies, though.

but, as l-l said, they're there to help you, not to judge you.
 
ecmnesia

ecmnesia

the only thing humans are equal in is death
Aug 30, 2020
767
Hey ecmnesia. In my experience the quality of an interaction depends entirely upon the psychiatrist as an individual. I've seen some who are absolutely brilliant, and others who have been terrible and almost dismissive.

Don't forget that they are there to help you. If you want to, when they say hello and how are you, tell them how you're nervous and worried.

In terms of being concerned about bringing your issues up: try not to be. The chances are that they've treated people who share similarities to yourself. If they judge? Fuck em.

Expect it to be uncomfortable - more because you're nervous than it actually being awkward. They will ask you some questions about yourself which might be unpleasant, too. Chances are this will be towards the start of your appointment because they'll be trying to get a handle on what they're dealing with, too.

Bottom line is: you'll be fine. Unless they deem you to be at immediate risk, they'll have no grounds to attempt to section you. You talk about what you want to talk about and see how it goes.

Good luck!
thank you so much, for real.
you don't have to share everything in the first session.

telling your therapist you have issues talking about your feelings and trauma would be a good first step. they could help you work through that first, so eventually you could get to a point where talking about your feelings and trauma isn't as distressing.

as for the consequences of talking about certain things... where i live, you'll only receive a consequence like hospitalization if your therapist thinks you're in danger of hurting yourself or others. what qualifies as danger varies, though.

but, as l-l said, they're there to help you, not to judge you.
it might sound dumb, but I didn't honestly thought about your point before. thank you so much.
 
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Sensei

Sensei

剣道家
Nov 4, 2019
6,337
My disorder can basically only be treated with medication so I have little experience of psychotherapy, but I know this: since you are here, you want to kill yourself, and if you want to kill yourself, you have nothing to lose. In other words, I really think you should give it a shot. I'm sure it will turn out just fine in the end.
 
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CuddleHug

CuddleHug

Back, but with less enthusiasm. Hugs~
Feb 22, 2020
260
I've had plenty of bad experiences with therapists/psychologists in the past, but currently have a good one. I think it's important to recognise that not everyone is a good fit for you. If you don't feel comfortable or they pressure you in any way, you should tell them. If they don't respect that, stop seeing them and look for another.

It's also important to remember that a therapist can't read your mind. They can see patterns and guess based on experience, but in the end it's up to you to help them understand. You also need to be prepared to work on yourself, and that's not easy. Especially when it's heavy things like the topics you mentioned. There will be times where you feel absolute shit after sessions and that's completely normal. Therapy is hard work.

My advice is to be honest and tell them that you are scared of opening up. You can also tell them you have several difficult things you need to talk about, but don't feel ready to bring them up right away. It's perfectly okay to take your time. You don't have to dig into the heavy stuff on the first session. In fact, you probably shouldn't, because they need time to get to know you as well.
 
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watsonsmith

watsonsmith

Member
Aug 31, 2020
98
On top of what has been said before I would suggest to be as honest as possible – you might actually find it to be a great relief that you can finally talk to someone in person about these difficult experiences without the fear of being judged. Look at it as an opportunity, no harm will come your way. In case they are not empathetic to your problems and you don't feel comfortable you can always try someone else.

It's great that you are seeking out help, it takes a lot of courage. You will be fine.
 
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adrienne

adrienne

postalservice
Sep 16, 2022
11
On top of what has been said before I would suggest to be as honest as possible – you might actually find it to be a great relief that you can finally talk to someone in person about these difficult experiences without the fear of being judged. Look at it as an opportunity, no harm will come your way. In case they are not empathetic to your problems and you don't feel comfortable you can always try someone else.

It's great that you are seeking out help, it takes a lot of courage. You will be fine.
Indeed it does takes a lot of courage. Congratulations putting your foot through a door :)
 
M

makethepainstop

Specialist
Sep 16, 2022
326
When you have been hurt or abused by others, their should be no shame on you. The shame should belong to those who hurt and abuse others. Five minute strong hug to you.