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ScaredOfLife

Arcanist
Jul 9, 2018
441
I was reading the Peaceful Pill Handbook chapter on helium and exit bags. I saw the peacefulness rating is 7/10 because before quickly losing consciousness there is "air hunger" and "alarm". I'm trying to wrap my mind around what they mean by "air hunger" because I was under the impression there was no sensation like suffocation or breathing in carbon dioxide. What do you think air hunger feels like? Granted, it probably won't matter much since consciousness is lost quickly. I'm just trying to predict how much I will panic. Any ideas?
 
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Smilla

Smilla

-
Apr 30, 2018
2,549
I was reading the Peaceful Pill Handbook chapter on helium and exit bags. I saw the peacefulness rating is 7/10 because before quickly losing consciousness there is "air hunger" and "alarm". I'm trying to wrap my mind around what they mean by "air hunger" because I was under the impression there was no sensation like suffocation or breathing in carbon dioxide. What do you think air hunger feels like? Granted, it probably won't matter much since consciousness is lost quickly. I'm just trying to predict how much I will panic. Any ideas?

I’ve wondered about this too and am confused also.
 
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Deivis

Deivis

Seul contre tous
Jul 23, 2018
235
I actually tried it few months ago (see my other post from yesterday). No panic response whatsoever. None!
And mind it, I tried it in a very excited state, in the afternoon and full awareness.

When you be ready, dont have a sleep for 2 full days, until you become very sleepy and exhausted.
It will add up.

And lastly, it's not a gun or poison. You have all time in the world to rehearse and try again.
 
Deivis

Deivis

Seul contre tous
Jul 23, 2018
235
I was reading the Peaceful Pill Handbook chapter on helium and exit bags. I saw the peacefulness rating is 7/10 because before quickly losing consciousness there is "air hunger" and "alarm". I'm trying to wrap my mind around what they mean by "air hunger" because I was under the impression there was no sensation like suffocation or breathing in carbon dioxide. What do you think air hunger feels like? Granted, it probably won't matter much since consciousness is lost quickly. I'm just trying to predict how much I will panic. Any ideas?

Speaking of air hunger itself - it feels like breathing a totally dry, odorless, thin air. Hard to explain if you havent been to high mountains (4km and up), but take my word - there is no time to judge or taste it - you pass out in 6-7-8 full breaths..
 
S

ScaredOfLife

Arcanist
Jul 9, 2018
441
I actually tried it few months ago (see my other post from yesterday). No panic response whatsoever. None!
And mind it, I tried it in a very excited state, in the afternoon and full awareness.

When you be ready, dont have a sleep for 2 full days, until you become very sleepy and exhausted.
It will add up.

And lastly, it's not a gun or poison. You have all time in the world to rehearse and try again.

I was happy to read your report, especially when you said there was no panic. Thanks for sharing.
 
J

jethacan

Member
Apr 17, 2018
55
I haven't tried it but I may have felt a similar sensation when trying hanging. Like you say, it doesn't feel like suffocation, but as I felt myself passing out and I knew it was from a lack of oxygen to the brain, it did make me want to quickly get 'air' back.

It was more of a survival instinct kind of panic, rather than the distinct physical feeling of co2 build up. If someone was completely unaware of the nitrogen I'm sure they would not have much alarm and peacefully pass out, but it's different when you inflict it on yourself and understand what's happening. I think what I'm describing is common to all methods, unless they're instant. So maybe I'm misunderstanding the 'air hunger'.
 
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ScaredOfLife

Arcanist
Jul 9, 2018
441
I haven't tried it but I may have felt a similar sensation when trying hanging. Like you say, it doesn't feel like suffocation, but as I felt myself passing out and I knew it was from a lack of oxygen to the brain, it did make me want to quickly get 'air' back.

It was more of a survival instinct kind of panic, rather than the distinct physical feeling of co2 build up. If someone was completely unaware of the nitrogen I'm sure they would not have much alarm and peacefully pass out, but it's different when you inflict it on yourself and understand what's happening. I think what I'm describing is common to all methods, unless they're instant. So maybe I'm misunderstanding the 'air hunger'.

It's probably kinda like what you've mentioned. Just knowing we're not breathing oxygen is enough to produce air hunger. Even if it is a relatively peaceful way to go, I know I will still feel really nervous before and after pulling the bag over my head. Just thinking about it now makes me feel nervous, but this is a feeling I'll have no choice but to overcome. No matter how much fear I feel, I still have to do this.
 
F

Final Escape

I’ve been here too long
Jul 8, 2018
4,353
The people in the pictures who have gone this way look pretty peaceful.
I don’t expect this to feel like a euphoric pleasure or anything, I’m merely hoping for as little discomfort as possible. I think a little practice will reduce the anxiety a lot. Plus I already made up my mind fully so I don’t feel any feelings like oh wait I’m not sure about this at last minute.
 
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ScaredOfLife

Arcanist
Jul 9, 2018
441
I don’t expect this to feel like a euphoric pleasure or anything, I’m merely hoping for as little discomfort as possible. I think a little practice will reduce the anxiety a lot. Plus I already made up my mind fully so I don’t feel any feelings like oh wait I’m not sure about this at last minute.

I was actually expecting a little euphoria, which is why I was surprised to read about the air hunger and alarm.

Please let us know when you've made your exit bag. I'd like to know if it is easy to construct.
 
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i187914

Member
May 24, 2018
32
I was reading the Peaceful Pill Handbook chapter on helium and exit bags. I saw the peacefulness rating is 7/10 because before quickly losing consciousness there is "air hunger" and "alarm".

"Air hunger" and "alarm" are triggered by the presence of CO2 but, if done properly, the inert gas method should remove CO2 from the picture entirely - the incoming nitrogen washes out any remaining CO2 and makes up the major part of the breathable space inside the exit bag.

The Role of Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

In normal respiration, the body makes use of oxygen and produces as waste the gas, carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is removed from the body as we breath out. While the human body is relatively insensitive to falling levels of oxygen, it is very sensitive to any rise in the level of carbon dioxide in inhaled air. When the body detects a slight increase of carbon dioxide in the air that we breathe, a warning message from the brain alerts the person. They will be roused and may react by gasping. If a person is using a plastic Exit bag, the rise in the level of carbon dioxide within the bag may result in the person struggling to pull the bag from their head. This reaction is known as a Hypercapnic (high carbon dioxide) Alarm Response. Sleep Apnoea provides an example of hypercapnic alarm. Here the person with sleep apnea snores so heavily that they deny themselves the oxygen they need. However, it is not the lowering of the oxygen level that alarms and wakes the person, but the accompanying rise in the level of carbon dioxide. If the fall in oxygen were not accompanied by this rise in carbon dioxide, the Sleep Apnoeic would be far more likely to die. In the depressurized aircraft, the oxygen level drops but there is no accompanying rise in carbon dioxide, hence a peaceful death is the common outcome.
 
S

ScaredOfLife

Arcanist
Jul 9, 2018
441
"Air hunger" and "alarm" are triggered by the presence of CO2 but, if done properly, the inert gas method should remove CO2 from the picture entirely - the incoming nitrogen washes out any remaining CO2 and makes up the major part of the breathable space inside the exit bag.

The Role of Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

In normal respiration, the body makes use of oxygen and produces as waste the gas, carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is removed from the body as we breath out. While the human body is relatively insensitive to falling levels of oxygen, it is very sensitive to any rise in the level of carbon dioxide in inhaled air. When the body detects a slight increase of carbon dioxide in the air that we breathe, a warning message from the brain alerts the person. They will be roused and may react by gasping. If a person is using a plastic Exit bag, the rise in the level of carbon dioxide within the bag may result in the person struggling to pull the bag from their head. This reaction is known as a Hypercapnic (high carbon dioxide) Alarm Response. Sleep Apnoea provides an example of hypercapnic alarm. Here the person with sleep apnea snores so heavily that they deny themselves the oxygen they need. However, it is not the lowering of the oxygen level that alarms and wakes the person, but the accompanying rise in the level of carbon dioxide. If the fall in oxygen were not accompanied by this rise in carbon dioxide, the Sleep Apnoeic would be far more likely to die. In the depressurized aircraft, the oxygen level drops but there is no accompanying rise in carbon dioxide, hence a peaceful death is the common outcome.

I was just thinking, if we're not breathing oxygen, would carbon dioxide even be created? Isn't oxygen required for the creation of carbon dioxide?
 
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i187914

Member
May 24, 2018
32
I was just thinking, if we're not breathing oxygen, would carbon dioxide even be created? Isn't oxygen required for the creation of carbon dioxide?

There will be some air in the exit bag when you pull it over your head. You will breathe that air in and breathe out CO2. Then shortly after all of the air in the bag and the CO2 will be replaced by nitrogen and your brain will "think" it is still in an air environment and you will go into a hypoxic state where you have no "air hunger" any more. It's actually supposed to be a euphoric state:

 
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azeton

Student
Jun 2, 2018
100
You pass out in 8 - 12 seconds
 

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A

azeton

Student
Jun 2, 2018
100
You pass out in 8 - 12 seconds.
 

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  • Effect of rapid decompression at FL450 ( 240 X 352 ) (1) (1).mp4
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