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NoPillPhilosophy

NoPillPhilosophy

Member
Aug 10, 2018
47
A personality disorder I have.
A disorder.
A disease.
A sickness.
Something is wrong with me.

It is an ilness to question orders given to you by people you do not trust, you dont respect, you do not know. The second worst thing you can say to someone with "authority" is "why?" The first one is "no".

Why? Why should I do that? Because everyone does it? Because someone said so?

This is how it's always been.
"Pick this up"
"Why?"
"BECAUSE I SAID SO"
"And?"
"DO YOU HAVE NO RESPECT?"
"I am not the one yelling."
"ARE YOU CRAZY?"
"No. And I do not respect you."
"PICK IT UP NOW?"
"And if i don't?"
"I'LL TORTURE YOU AND EVERYONE YOU'VE EVER LOVED."


Why would they say that? If they really know better why not take two seconds to explain it to me? Why not argue with me if their position is right? Why not convince me? Why get angry?

The rest will say "they know better and we need rules and we need to listen to them, it benefits us all"

Because the ones who make the rules have our best interests at heart. Because they want us to have the truth. They want us to have freedom. Power. Be as healthy as possible. Be as comfortable as possible. Be the best version of ourselves.

That's what the point of the system is isn't it?

What a joke. I am mentally ill. I am sick. I am crazy. I am stupid. I am hateful. I am wrong.

In a sick world, being healthy is a mental illness.


What a joke.






But it doesn't matter....I can kill all of it at any moment, one day I will
 
Tiburcio

Tiburcio

Voluntary deletion.
May 9, 2018
1,573
I have the same problem. Add to this a huge pride as I have and you will live in constant conflict, but at least I have some dignity.
 
C

creatureoflight

Mage
Jul 27, 2018
531
This one doesn't. You call this a working society??

It could theorethically be possible to have one where there is no need for authority.

Humans are hierarchical animals as is everything else in nature. Authority is only natural. Of course, it does not have to be some kind of brutal dictatorship but human societies have always been that way and there have always been rebels and revolutionaries that oppose it. Anarchy does not work. Society has never been working and will never be working because humans are way too selfish.
 
NoPillPhilosophy

NoPillPhilosophy

Member
Aug 10, 2018
47
Humans are hierarchical animals as is everything else in nature. Authority is only natural. Of course, it does not have to be some kind of brutal dictatorship but human societies have always been that way and there have always been rebels and revolutionaries that oppose it. Anarchy does not work. Society has never been working and will never be working because humans are way too selfish.
Yes it will never work because humans are selfish devils.

But it was possible. All the potential lost.... This isn't a "it isn't theorethically possible" it is a "it will never work"
 
D

Dip

Student
Jul 27, 2018
171
Humans are hierarchical animals as is everything else in nature. Authority is only natural. Of course, it does not have to be some kind of brutal dictatorship but human societies have always been that way and there have always been rebels and revolutionaries that oppose it. Anarchy does not work. Society has never been working and will never be working because humans are way too selfish.

Interesting...

http://freakonomics.com/podcast/new-freakonomics-radio-podcast-the-suicide-paradox/

Here's a handy transcript of part of the podcast that might interest you:

"
Stephen Dubner (host): “Dan Everett is a college professor. A linguist. Off and on for the past thirty years he’s lived with a tribe in the Amazon called the Pirahã.”

Dan Everett: “I originally went to the Pirahã as a missionary to translate the Bible into their language. But over the course of many years they wound up converting me and I became a scientist instead, and I studied their culture and its effects on their language.”

Host: “The Pirahã live in huts, sleep on the ground, hunt with bows and arrows. But what really caught Everett’s attention is that they are relentlessly happy. Really happy.”

Dan Everett: “This happiness and this contentment is really what had a lot to do with me abandoning my religious goals and my religion altogether, because they seemed to have it a lot more together than most religious people I knew.”

Host: “But this isn’t just another story about some faraway tribe that’s really happy even though they don’t have all the stuff that we have. It’s a story about something that happened during Everett’s early days with the tribe. He and his wife and his three young kids had just finished dinner. Everett gathered about thirty Pirahã in his hut to preach to them.”

Dan Everett: “I was still a very fervent Christian missionary and I wanted to tell them how God had changed my life. So I told them a story about my stepmother and how she had committed suicide because she was so depressed and so lost. For the word ‘depressed’ I used the word sad, so she was very sad, she was crying, she felt lost and she shot herself in the head and she died. And this had a large spiritual impact on me, and I later became a missionary and came to the Pirahã because of all this experience triggered by her suicide. And I told this story as tenderly as I could and tried to communicate that it had a huge impact on me, and when I was finished, everyone burst out laughing….When I asked them, ‘why are you laughing?’ they said, ‘She killed herself! That’s really funny to us! We don’t kill ourselves. You mean you people, you white people, shoot yourselves in the head? We shoot animals, we kill animals, we don’t kill ourselves.’ They just found it absolutely inexplicable and without precedent in their own experience that someone would kill themselves.”

Host: “In the thirty years that Everett has been studying the Pirahã, there have been zero suicides. Now, it’s not that suicide doesn’t happen in the Amazon. For other tribes, it’s a problem.”

Dan Everett: “And as I’ve told this story, some people have suggested that well, it’s because they don’t have the stresses of modern life. But that’s just not true. There’s almost 100 percent endemic malaria among the people. They’re sick a lot. Their children die at probably 75 percent; 75 percent of the children die before they reach the age of five or six. These are astounding pressures.”

Host:: "A group of people that laughs at suicide? That doesn’t sound much like the U.S. does it?”
"

Here's more:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirahã_people

"Daniel Everett states that one of the strongest Pirahã values is no coercion; you simply don't tell other people what to do.[6] There appears to be no social hierarchy; the Pirahã have no formal leaders. Their social system can thus be labeled as primitive communism, in common with many other hunter-gatherer bands in the world, although rare in the Amazon because of a history of agriculture before Western contact (see history of the Amazon)."

As you can see from their description, the Piraha social system is hardly unique among hunter-gatherer tribes.

It is an ilness to question orders given to you by people you do not trust, you dont respect, you do not know. The second worst thing you can say to someone with "authority" is "why?" The first one is "no".

Funnily enough I was also questioning and refusing orders and commonly held social narratives since primary school. In fact when I left high school one of the teachers left me with the remark that I could do very well in society if only I "played the game" as I was supposed to.
 
thetwilightzone

thetwilightzone

-
Jul 14, 2018
307
Would being reluctant to saying Yes Sir/No Sir in secondary school count? I moved schools and found it was absurdly strict to the point it backfired. Many teachers shouted at you if you didn't include Sir/Madam when you were addressing them.