Sharethepain

Sharethepain

We forge the chains we wear in life.
May 2, 2018
138
So, I have an old hunting rifle at home, and a 7.62×54mmR cartridge of bullets. The thing is, I'm not sure if the bullets are for the actual gun, because there used to be more guns here. What would happen if the ammunition type was wrong and the trigger was pulled? I've tried putting the bullets in the loading chamber and they seem to fit, but I'd rather not risk it, that is why I am asking what the consequences could be.
 
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R

Romanov1947

-
Mar 23, 2018
39
>What would happen if the ammunition type was wrong and the trigger was pulled?

You risk blowing the barrel up in your face.
 
Sharethepain

Sharethepain

We forge the chains we wear in life.
May 2, 2018
138
Yea that's what I thought, thanks for the reply though.
 
I

I will go soon

Member
Apr 9, 2018
62
You could take the gun to a store and they would be able to tell you. 7.62 for an old hunting rifle does seem like it could be a fit but I wouldn't be too sure. Look up the gun if you can and try to match a bullet if you can't make it to a store. Also you have other worries if the gun's old and has been sitting a while. You want to make sure it can fire, so have it cleaned or go test it out if you can.
 
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Roger

Roger

I Liked Ike
May 11, 2019
977
7.62x54mmR is the old Russian military cartridge, used in the Moisin Nagant Model1891 rifles from the end of the 19th Century until the introduction of the 7.62x39 round in the 1940s, and still in use for some Russian machine guns. Old Moisins were imported to the US and were quite cheap and popular as hunting/target rifles. You can Google the Moisin of course, but bear in mind that the stocks may have been cut down from the military full stock for civilian hunting use. This will change the appearance of the rifle, and as the original was quite long, the barrel may have been shortened too, for practical hunting use, taking any bayonet lugs with it.
Check and see (without firing) if the bolt closes and locks comfortably on a chambered cartridge, and look for Russian markings on the rifle. Even if the alpha characters are in Cyrillic, there may be numeric characters which will give a clue. M1891, for example, or1891/30 (there was a major redesign in 1930). It should have an internal 5 round magazine - see if the rounds fit and cycle from mag to breech, extraction and ejection. Any difficulty may not necessarily mean that the rounds do not match the rifle, but if it is pretty old it may be that the cartridge headspace needs adjusting.
The round is rimmed, and there should be an annular step in the face of the breech where the rim sits. If using live rounds to do this, keep fingers away from trigger, and muzzle pointing in a safe direction. If you are not certain, then get a gunsmith to have a look.
 
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