DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Hello, this is my first post here... never used this server. Some of you may already know me from SanctionedSuicide and to those who do, it's a pleasure seeing you again. But anyway... I have something to share.

Before you read, please know this isn't a troll post. This is a THEORETICAL improvised method. So if anyone is gonna accuse me of trolling, then I don't know what to tell you. But I could DEFINITELY use your input. I've already posted this before and it's gotten nowhere, but I'm giving it another go. Hopefully, the results will be different.

Anyhow...

I developed this dual-purpose technique that triggers the release of adrenaline. It was originally made to temporarily induce one's hysterical strength. But then I realised that it has the potential to cause a heart attack due to excess adrenaline. So theoretically, it could be used as a suicide method. Indeed, I have experimented the technique myself and had a few other people test it out. Of course, none of us have really taken it to an extreme. So far, this technique would probably only work as a suicide method for people with heart conditions. But that doesn't mean it couldn't be improved, as it is still in beta (testing).

Before I explain to you about how to do this little technique, it is important that you do quick, short breaths and hold in intervals at all times.

1. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart.

2. Raise your arms slightly to the sides and fully extended with your palms facing out to the direction that is in front of you. You should look like you're doing a semi-T-pose. Then tilt your head all the way back. Your back might need to be arched a little. Remain in that position. Soon, you'll notice an increase in your heart rate, a tingling sensation in your arms, as well your breathing rate (control your breathing, avoid hyperventilating). This is what I'll call the potential point; the longer you remain in this pose, the stronger the effects will be.

3. Once you feel like you're ready, slowly raise your arms up until your hands are directly above your head. Turn your hands inward and clench your fists. Hold it like that until your hands begin violently shaking. *2nd Potential Point*

4. Slowly lower your arms and bring it to an "X" position and hold it. Your arm muscles will tighten gradually. As it does so, accelerate and shorten your breathing. *3rd Potential Point*

5. Finally, thrust your elbows down and tense every muscle you can think of as hard as you can to the point it hurts. Do it as long as you feel is necessary.

As I've probably stated before this suicide method is still in beta (incomplete), but once it's perfected, you can theoretically kill yourself with it by stressing your heart out.

https://media.8ch.net/file_store/d9...b4d18738638080a9b87f61698da621423d58de4de.mp4

This animation I made is a demonstration of how the technique would be executed. Of course, you don't gain lighting nor the red flames. But the lightning represents the tingling surge you'll feel. And the red color represents tension as well as the flushing of your skin.

I don't know the time it takes to hit dangerous levels. But as a guesstimate, I'd say to hold each pose for several minutes. Perhaps 5-10 : 5 : 3-5 minutes respectively.

As I've stated before, the technique as a suicide method is still incomplete and still needs to be perfected. I'm still trying to figure out ways to improve it.

Also if you do manage to get some effect but fail at killing yourself with it, you're going to have to let it run its course, including the burnout phase that'll occur once the adrenaline effect wears off before you decide to try again. Otherwise, you're going to end up wasting your time and end up being even more exhausted.

Thanks for taking the time to read, if you have.

I'll later be explaining in the comments in how it works.
 
Last edited:
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Wouldn't this hurt quite a bit?
Yes... and there may be some vomiting.

That said... some pepto bismol should help ease the pain due to its subsalicylate ion. And metoclopramide should suffice as the nausea is due to increased dopamine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cyanide
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
As promised, I'll explain the mechanism behind this technique.

The adrenaline is caused by hypoxia, hypercapnia, as well as shallow breathing.

The hypercapnia is due to breath holding. Hypoxia is from the constriction of the vertebral arteries from you leaning your head back. And Shallow breathing just tricks the brain into thinking you're in danger, thus holding in and increasing adrenaline levels.
 
Last edited:
accidentaldeath

accidentaldeath

Student
May 29, 2018
107
Nice, but I feel pretty stupid trying. I tried just to get the adrenaline effect, but I can't feel anything, what I might be doing wrong, how much time is the interval in which I have to hold the breath during the whole process?
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Nice, but I feel pretty stupid trying. I tried just to get the adrenaline effect, but I can't feel anything, what I might be doing wrong, how much time is the interval in which I have to hold the breath during the whole process?

Interval of quick and shallow breaths... perhaps for 30-120 seconds, then hold your breath for 30 seconds, rinse and repeat. Start off at breathing at 1 breath/second then gradually increase the breathing rate as your arms tingle.

Takes practice of course...
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Update: Sorry for bringing this post up again. But I miscalculated. Don't use dopamine-inhibiting antiemetics. You're going to need that dopamine to synthesize that adrenaline. Instead, use some antimuscinaric+anticholinergic antiemetics (atropine/scopolamine). They have an added benefit in potentializing adrenaline. Then there's also emetrol. Dont know the effectiveness of that antiemetic. You're gonna have to research on that.
 
W

war-is-lost

Student
Apr 15, 2018
124
I appreciate the effort and the creative thoughts you put into this idea. I just tried it twice and nothing happened. I don't even feel the tingling feelings. Is this designed only for people with pre-existing cardiovascular problems?
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
I appreciate the effort and the creative thoughts you put into this idea. I just tried it twice and nothing happened. I don't even feel the tingling feelings. Is this designed only for people with pre-existing cardiovascular problems?

It's more easier to pull off for people with heart disease. But it could perhaps work for healthy people. I will at some point do a proper video demonstration whenever I happen to get my hands on a heart rate monitor.

Would you care to tell me exactly how you did it?
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
To get a better idea, this is the result of the bearshaek test. My latest attempt resulted in my heart rate rising up to 150 in 15 minutes. At that level, I became all sweaty and was shaking. I could've gone higher if I spent longer doing the technique.

What I've used to measured my heart rate wasn't an actual heart rate monitor, but an application. Which I manually had to put my finger on a camera light to read my pulse. It is consistent, nonetheless. But I will need an actual watch/wristband.
 

Attachments

  • 06a86fd3d75f5ffd79239af60dac7cc30afb306135fd6c54b7b30c643093e4d2.png
    06a86fd3d75f5ffd79239af60dac7cc30afb306135fd6c54b7b30c643093e4d2.png
    46.4 KB · Views: 44
  • Screenshot_2018-06-15-01-18-27-1.png
    Screenshot_2018-06-15-01-18-27-1.png
    8 KB · Views: 42
Last edited:
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Alright...
It looks like I found some new information. Apparently, acute stress sustained for about 2 hours is enough to induce a heart attack. I guess the issue with this technique is time. Luckily, heart attacks aren't the only way you'll die from the bearshaek technique. This is quite risky however. During an adrenaline rush, your blood pressure increases as well. If taken high enough, you'll end up having a stroke. While it's likely not as painful as a heart attack, non fatal strokes cause brain damage.

To induce a stroke during the charging process is to gradually pressurize your breath during the breath hold. Take this with a grain of salt though.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Cyanide and Caerula
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Alright...
It looks like I found some new information. Apparently, acute stress sustained for about 2 hours is enough to induce a heart attack. I guess the issue with this technique is time. Luckily, heart attacks aren't the only way you'll die from the bearshaek technique. This is quite risky however. During an adrenaline rush, your blood pressure increases as well. If taken high enough, you'll end up having a stroke. While it's likely not as painful as a heart attack, non fatal strokes cause brain damage.

To induce a stroke during the charging process is to gradually pressurize your breath during the breath hold. Take this with a grain of salt though.

Update: I did a bit more research on the pressurized breath holding part and it turned out to be called, "Valsalva Maneuver". A better way to describe it is that you hold your breath, attempt to exhale through closed airways, and bear down. In layman's terms, you hold your breath hard.
Apparently, this may also increase the chances of having a heart attack, as upon releasing, your heart rate would initially "overshoot" before going into reflex bradycardia. Of course, your blood pressure will still rise sharply due to the constriction of blood vessels so you still may also get a stroke. The longer you hold it, the greater the effects are.

Think of it as a dam full of water waiting to be released out at any opportunity. Suddenly remove the dam, and BOOM! Water shoots out with extreme force. Should this work, then this is the FINAL STAGE of bearshaek.
 
Last edited:
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Whelp... it seems like I hit a dead end with bearshaek. Even with the valsalva maneuver, I am completely uncertain if that's even enough, despite the face I did an experiment on bearshaek and VM combination and ended up with a splitting headache. Because of the uncertainty, I'm putting this in rhe backburner. Meaning... I won't talk about this for a while, until I come up with a surefire way to improve the odds.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cyanide and Caerula
Definitelyworried

Definitelyworried

Member
Jun 19, 2018
555
I did know a guy in his older 40s, looked healthy, and after a work out he felt tired and stayed home instead of going grocery shopping with his wife that day cause of the way he felt(not normal). When she came back he was dead laying in the sofa that he was in before she left. I didn't hear that he went through pain, he just felt really tired. Supposedly it was unintentional, but there could be a hiden story behind it all.
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
I did know a guy in his older 40s, looked healthy, and after a work out he felt tired and stayed home instead of going grocery shopping with his wife that day cause of the way he felt(not normal). When she came back he was dead laying in the sofa that he was in before she left. I didn't hear that he went through pain, he just felt really tired. Supposedly it was unintentional, but there could be a hiden story behind it all.

Hum... I'm gonna have to research this. There perhaps is some hope. Thanks!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Caerula and Cyanide
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Think I found a way to increase the chances of it working; sleep deprivation. Based on quick research, sleep deprivation pretty much weakens the heart muscle increasing the possibility of stroke or heart attack. Don't quite know how long one should stay up, but as a starting guesstimate, I'd have to say... 72 hours.
In simple terms... stay up for at least 3 days and perform the bearshaek+valsalva maneuver combination. I will need to research a little more. But what are your thoughts on this?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Caerula and Cyanide
Definitelyworried

Definitelyworried

Member
Jun 19, 2018
555
Think I found a way to increase the chances of it working; sleep deprivation. Based on quick research, sleep deprivation pretty much weakens the heart muscle increasing the possibility of stroke or heart attack. Don't quite know how long one should stay up, but as a starting guesstimate, I'd have to say... 72 hours.
In simple terms... stay up for at least 3 days and perform the bearshaek+valsalva maneuver combination. I will need to research a little more. But what are your thoughts on this?
Whether it would work or not, it's still very unreliable, and too much work required in spite of its unreliability, is my opinion.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Caerula and Cyanide
Definitelyworried

Definitelyworried

Member
Jun 19, 2018
555
I think if you have the energy and time to try it, its your life everyone choses different methods. And it could work, who knows, but it's just something I would not try, mysrlf.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Caerula and Cyanide
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
So... I did another test and recorded a video so you can see for yourself, unfortunately I still don't have a proper heart rate monitor that I could strap on my wrist, but... I guess this will have to do as I took the time to record my pulse before and after doing the technique, as well as the dropout. This may be cringy, and I'm sorry, but please bear with me. This is the video: https://photos.app.goo.gl/HQNEiN1SsWvk16pP6

This here took about 8 minutes, which is the time it took to bring my heart rate from 72 to 151 bpm and you'll know that it took quite a while for my heart rate to return to normal. https://photos.app.goo.gl/MJXSTQoR4Xikbmj69

I did a previous attempt on it, but couldn't get all that high compared to the 150 I did before, only increased my heart rate from 61 to 127 in over 12 minutes with great difficulty, and it was vexing, until I noticed how quickly my heart rate returned to baseline. This was done in a cold enviornment. This is the result of the previous attempt. https://photos.app.goo.gl/t3ZgZkbj9zXLW3Dz8

This lead me to believe that temperature may play a factor in this... and considering I did a recent modification of it by adding the valsalva maneuver, this will actually increase the chances of heart attack. Perhaps just enough to make sleep deprivation less necessary.

Since the environmental heat may not be enough, I figured I could potentiate this with a bit of anyicholinergic drugs, such as scopolamine/atropine... as this would increase body temperature by inhibiting sweating, which will lead to your heart beating faster.

Thoughts?
 
C

creatureoflight

Mage
Jul 27, 2018
531
I don't think this is realistic and reliable. The body is not stupid and it won't just die from too much adrenaline from this method. I suppose it can affect individuals who have heart disease or something but I don't think this can kill a healthy young person.
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
I don't think this is realistic and reliable. The body is not stupid and it won't just die from too much adrenaline from this method. I suppose it can affect individuals who have heart disease or something but I don't think this can kill a healthy young person.

Yeah, I'm aware of the body passing out from all the adrenaline, I'm at the point where I'm trying to bypass it, which the only thing I can come up with is to do the valsalva maneuver during its absolute peak.

Thanks for your input.
 
Suicideisnirvana

Suicideisnirvana

Specialist
Aug 4, 2018
312
LOL if i was able to do shit like this i'd rather burn myself with oil and fire, way easier and more effective.
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
LOL if i was able to do shit like this i'd rather burn myself with oil and fire, way easier and more effective.

Well... it's a type of method only to be used as a last resort if you have absolutely no means and no access to anything... or if you're locked up in a prison or ward.

Though I'd have to agree regarding the effectiveness as the technique is risky at this point, even without being in a hot environment.
 
DetachedDreamer97

DetachedDreamer97

Enlightened
Mar 17, 2018
1,114
Alright... I guess this will almost certainly be my final update. Was hesitant on sharing this as I can't quite prove it, but I did a recent attempt and managed to bring my pulse up to between 170-200 bpm. But I could only hold it for a few seconds before I lost control of my breathing and dropped to 152 bpm.

On another note, I managed to find resources.

Valsalva Maneuver:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17689388/
https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1161/str.26.8.1386

Head Tilt:
https://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/central/cervical/controversy.html
https://livehealthy.chron.com/stretching-neck-should-roll-head-back-5817.html
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2656304/

Shallow+Rapid Breathing
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1469-8986.1971.tb00500.x
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1402719/

Heat Stress/Sleep Deprivation
https://opencommons.uconn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1158&context=srhonors_theses
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/heat-stroke-hyperthermia-
http://www.sleepeducation.org/news/2012/12/18/sleep-deprivation-disrupts-regulation-of-body-heat
https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/sleep/conditioninfo/sleep-deprivation
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2375540/#!po=45.8333
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3496876/#!po=13.3117

Hypoxia:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/6853714/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10722862
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4059097/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2343035/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1797062/

Hypercapnia:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypercapnia
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/2513441
https://www.evidencebased.net/ce/case2/cards/Permisv_hypercapnia.html
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022480465800439