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nuclearsnake

Student
Jul 11, 2018
147
How likely is it to fail CO? I've been thinking about locking myself in a garage with two buckets full of briquettes and two disposable BBQ grills (and a bottle of vodka). Is that enough to off myself?

I'm really scared I might mess it up somehow. There's this idea in my head that maybe the coals suddenly cool down and the CO level won't reach a high enough concentrations to kill me or it will all be gone from the air before I'm dead.

But apparently people kill themselves with CO by accident all the time. Still, I want to make sure it's going to work.

Also, would it be best to put a warning sign outside of the garage or could I leave it inside so it's one of the first things you see once you open? A sign outside would increase my chances of early discovery and I don't want that.
 
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Ssname

Experienced
Jun 30, 2018
268
Hi there. I'm no expert and certainly not suggesting you do or don't do anything because it isn't my place to but here are my 2 cents...

First off I think anyone using gas should put a sign up explaining the dangers. From my understanding CO binds to the haemoglobin in your red blood cells and stops oxygen from being able to bind to it. It could be dangerous to someone after a few deep breaths even in an environment that still contains plenty of oxygen so I think the signs have to be outside.

In terms of quantity I am not sure I guess it depends on the volume of the garage and how air tight it is. I have looked I to this method a bit and would probably try to buy an industrial tank of CO to minimise the chances of not completing it. Not sure about the cost but it seems accessible enough where I am at least.

Edit: typos
 
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EternalSanction

EternalSanction

-
Jun 7, 2018
252
1) It really depends on how big your garage is, but generally speaking you should chose an area as small as possible.
I believe there is a formula in the pph to calculate the needed mass of charcoal.

2) You need to make sure your garage is sealed tightly, so nothing will leak out.

3) Put warning signs up! Otherwise you're endangering paramedics arriving at the scene or you family/friends.

If you're not sure if the chosen place works out for you, you could do a test run beforehand. This can be done with a co-meter (should be capable of measuring up to 10.000ppm).
 

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