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silentvoice

Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2019
Messages
23
I've come to the conclusion that I probably need therapy to get through a lot of my issues. But I'm scared when it comes to picking one. How exactly do I pick a good therapist for my issues (gender dysphoria, self image issues, depression, and anxiety)? If it's not too much to ask, can I hear some stories of what to expect/how effective it is for the people who went to therapy?
 
The Lonely

The Lonely

Just trying to get in the next bus…
Joined
Jan 26, 2021
Messages
250
rs929 said:
This is a hard question.

One approach is - to find the treatment with most evidence for your illness. Then find a therapist that specializes in such therapy.

Check out https://div12.org/psychological-treatments/

Omg! Yeah ! Nice Advice!
silentvoice said:
I've come to the conclusion that I probably need therapy to get through a lot of my issues. But I'm scared when it comes to picking one. How exactly do I pick a good therapist for my issues (gender dysphoria, self image issues, depression, and anxiety)? If it's not too much to ask, can I hear some stories of what to expect/how effective it is for the people who went to therapy?

See: this person may show interest in you like human being instead of a client payer of her bills(sort of)…

And since you will actually pay part of this person bills, you’d better pay someone‘s bills whose opinions, beliefs and even political views are not far from yours… This in order to not hire a Natzi.

This is better to check earlier than she does (about you) and then will keep you hooked, just fooling you around.

Tricky. Some cards you better leave unfolded.
 
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Pallf

I'm tired
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May 27, 2018
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207
Make sure you get along well. rs929 is absolutely correct that you should get a person with experience in what you're dealing with, just make sure you mesh well with them too.
 
BitterlyAlive_

BitterlyAlive_

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Chiming in a bit late. There’s a few things to keep in mind. First, you want someone you can get along with. A good bond between the therapist and client is crucial to making progress. The modality that the therapist uses (cognitive behavioral therapy, Gestalt therapy, etc) is something to keep in mind as well, but if you don’t have that bond….

The role of a good therapist is to help facilitate change in the client. A therapist should guide the client and empower them to make changes in their life, within themselves, whatever. Their role is not to be your friend. As such, a good therapist also establishes boundaries (and respects yours). They don’t push you too hard, but it is not inherently bad to be uncomfortable in a session. After all, that is part of the process of change. They shouldn’t talk too much about themselves, they should let you arrive at your own conclusions (unless they’re trying to say something insightful).

mm. That’s all I can think of right now, but feel free to PM me with any questions. I know I’ve missed some things.
 
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everydayiloveyou

Experienced
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Jul 5, 2020
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254
Everyone has brought up great points!

Is this going to be your first time getting therapy? If so, you might learn more about what you like/dislike once you start getting into sessions.

For example, some people do really well with the psychoanalytical, lying down in a chair and venting kinda therapy where the therapist never says anything except a couple thoughtful quips once in a while. Other people need engagement, structure, advice, conversation, etc. So they might do better with CBT or Gestalt.

During your sessions, be honest when you're feeling uncomfortable. See how your therapist reacts, and note how their reactions make you feel. It's important that you can trust your therapist, that you feel they can understand you, and also that their therapeutic approach both challenges and helps you. So if at any point you're feeling like you're grasping at straws to engage with your therapist, like you are talking to an uncaring wall, or that you feel your therapist doesn't believe you or doubts you ... take a note of it! Don't be afraid to bring these things up and maybe look for someone else if it comes to that. You're paying to get treated, you should get your money's worth.

Good luck! hoping it goes great for you!
 
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