Volatile

Volatile

God
Jun 18, 2018
1,286
i hear it’s miserable. After getting out of there maybe i’d be rushing to a bridge.
 
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Warlock
Jul 13, 2018
724
Depends where you go. I was doxxed a late last year and sent to a psych ward for a little over a week.

Typically, we have group therapy in the morning. No shoelaces, belts, or anything that you could use for self-harm. Terrible good. Coffee isn't even caffeinated. Crazy people. Crazy expensive too.
 
Volatile

Volatile

God
Jun 18, 2018
1,286
Depends where you go. I was doxxed a late last year and sent to a psych ward for a little over a week.

Typically, we have group therapy in the morning. No shoelaces, belts, or anything that you could use for self-harm. Terrible good. Coffee isn't even caffeinated. Crazy people. Crazy expensive too.

How did you get doxxed? What if a person can’t afford hospitalization?
 
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Warlock
Jul 13, 2018
724
How did you get doxxed? What if a person can’t afford hospitalization?

How I got doxxed is a long story that I will not share here.

Well, if you are a deemed a threat to yourself and you report it. You're getting warded. And they'll bill you after. Typically a night in a psych ward equals out to about $1,500 a night.
 
Volatile

Volatile

God
Jun 18, 2018
1,286
How I got doxxed is a long story that I will not share here.

Well, if you are a deemed a threat to yourself and you report it. You're getting warded. And they'll bill you after. Typically a night in a psych ward equals out to about $1,500 a night.
I understand, so then how does one avoid getting doxxed?

It seems like the bill would just reignite any suicidal feelings.
 
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Pallf

I'm tired
May 27, 2018
248
Going to the psych ward is pretty bad. The food was bland, I was scared of a few other patients, and I had little to no privacy. Best thing to do is there is sleep.
We had different types of therapy to do, we talked to a psychiatrist every once in awhile, we had a daily regimen of pills to take and we watched a bunch of TV.
 
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Warlock
Jul 13, 2018
724
I understand, so then how does one avoid getting doxxed?

It seems like the bill would just reignite any suicidal feelings.

You don't post personal information.

Debt isn't something that would drive me further. I have no problem giving a big middle finger to a debt collector. On the other hand, I guess if you need to further ignite your feelings, it might work. Different strokes for different folks.
 
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Volatile

Volatile

God
Jun 18, 2018
1,286
Going to the psych ward is pretty bad. The food was bland, I was scared of a few other patients, and I had little to no privacy. Best thing to do is there is sleep.
We had different types of therapy to do, we talked to a psychiatrist every once in awhile, we had a daily regimen of pills to take and we watched a bunch of TV.

Sounds like prison. Do you get your own room?
 
S

Sadgirl19

Member
Jul 18, 2018
21
Its pretty miserable, imo, but can sometimes be comforting.

Last time I went I had mixed feelings.
When I woke up and realized I was alive and trapped there, I was livid.

Apparently if I didn't voluntarily sign myself in, or tried to petition to get myself out early, I would've had to stay longer and go to court or something.

A few days on Ativan and an antidepressant that worked well (not on it anymore because meds don't change life circumstances,just the ability to feel) and I felt hopeful. I felt a sense of community with a few others, and hopeful that I could make it through.
At the time I mostly wanted to die because I felt no one could ever care about me and humanity just seemed cold. I always end up in situations where I'm treated badly, and just wanted some friendship, some warmth or something.
A guy my age there took care of me, it was weird but felt nice.

Otherwise, I've been in the psych unit 3-4x and an eating disorder clinic once, which had a similar vibe. They're fairly miserable as a whole. Not being able to leave to even go outside, mandatory groups, everyone else there is mostly depressed, drugged, or angry, and seriously crazy,potentially dangerous people make it more awful.
Had a guy who thought he was Jesus keep asking me why a pretty girl would want to die. Woke up a few times to him standing in my doorway.

Roomies are also a thing. Luckily I had a great roommate last year, my first one was also good, but I have had some majorly awful ones. Worst one kept throwing furniture in our room and eventually got restrained to her bed. When I was allowed in, she was just lying there staring at the ceiling. I pretended to fall asleep really fast and she kept calling over to me, trying to wake me up. I never really feel safe in the hospital.
 
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aven

aven

Member
Jul 10, 2018
41
Nothing utterly nothing, was trapped there for a month and a half, the horror, they only let me out when I pretend I was no longer suicidal. They we're forcing me to take risperidone and seroquel at a high dosage, the side effect were horrific, I could have ended up with dyskinesia if I had taken these pills for 6months + like my psychiatrist wanted, sick fuck.
 
K

Karlala

Member
Jun 27, 2018
69
All this is so right I'll never go back to one of those I will just want to be gone instead living in one of those places is not healthy and the people are very insane
 
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dwimplepeen213

Member
Jun 26, 2018
37
I luckily had my own room, we had a chat with the mental health nurses daily and the psychiatrist every weekend but other than that unless you opted to do the shitty occupational therapy stuff (occasional baking) then just watch tv. I did notice everyone on a section including myself (unable to leave the ward) would pace all day just up and down the corridor but also shuffling like fucking zombies because we were all drugged up on antipsychotics. Boring as fuck and miserable places.
 
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Empty Smile

Empty Smile

The final Bell has rung. Goodbye to all.
Jul 13, 2018
1,786
I spent a month in one after I was stopped from an attempt. The one I was at was pretty mellow. You could wander around, and there were always snacks, and caffeine free soda and coffee.

We were on the 4th floor of this hospital, and of course, there were metal cages on the windows.

One woman who came in about a week after I did, was a real nut case, but hilarious, asked me If I knew why they put the cages on the windows. I told her my guess was to keep us from jumping.

She pulled me close and whispered into my ear, "No. It's to keep the squirrels from getting us fucking nuts."
 
Kit_the_kat

Kit_the_kat

Member
May 29, 2019
6
It’s boring, I was in there for two weeks. I told them what they wanted to hear so I could leave. The food sucked. Horrible coffee and the staff was irritating. I couldn’t sleep because they would open the door every 15 minutes. My bed was close to the door so the bright light from the hallway would hit me. The people were weird. Someone pissed on the floor my second day there. My roommate slept almost the entire time I was there. They had children’s books. Like why we are adults. People were fighting over cigarettes and candy. They played star wars for three days straight.
 
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not_a_robot

not_a_robot

"i hope the leaving is joyful, & never to return"
May 30, 2019
2,124
Color,
get bossed around by assholes on a powertrip,
have some dipshit doctor with the I.Q of armadillo tell me that I didn't live through the experiences I did, and that I don't really feel the way I feel.

I don't see how that failed to "fix" me!

It’s boring, I was in there for two weeks. I told them what they wanted to hear so I could leave. The food sucked. Horrible coffee and the staff was irritating. I couldn’t sleep because they would open the door every 15 minutes. My bed was close to the door so the bright light from the hallway would hit me. The people were weird. Someone pissed on the floor my second day there. My roommate slept almost the entire time I was there. They had children’s books. Like why we are adults. People were fighting over cigarettes and candy. They played star wars for three days straight.
Yep. They just gaslight you and mindfuck you til you start reciting their script.
Oh and no reading material of my own choosing! Boring predictable books!
TORTURE!
 
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SuicidalDream

SuicidalDream

Member
Jun 1, 2019
44
It depends. I’ve been hospitalized 4 times. Twice I managed to get my own room, the other two times I shared a room with 2 or 3 people. You never know what the staff will be like. Some are really nice, others do more harm than good. The food is kinda shitty but not always terrible. Going to group therapy sucks but doing it will usually get you out of there more quickly. The other patients can be fun to talk to, but some are truly crazy. I once woke up in the middle of the night to the sound of one screaming at the staff to clean up his piss off the floor. I also shared a room with a girl who would randomly start screaming about Jesus and the staff had to restrain her a few times.
 
J

Jessica5

Specialist
May 22, 2019
336
How did you get doxxed? What if a person can’t afford hospitalization?


I've only been able to find Florida and New Jersey's policies on this. In Florida and NJ, a patient is only required to pay if they have the ability to pay- at least in theory.

However, they might claim that everybody has the ability to pay. And it's not like anybody who's too indigent to pay will be able to afford a lawyer to challenge the payment.
 
6000qqq

6000qqq

Member
May 13, 2019
24
I’ve been to 3 different inpatients but only been in the adolescent units. I don’t imagine they’re much different from the adult units but I feel it’s worth mentioning. Tbh we didn’t really do.. anything. They all had group therapies, but other than that the days were pretty empty. In the better hospital I was in there was an an exercise and an arts and crafts room and that was cool.
From my experience, the hospital isn't bad, it’s just extremely boring. But I guess the goal isn’t really to have a good time lol.
The only good thing about inpatient is meeting new people. You meet some characters in there that’s for sure..
Some things I think you should know is you aren’t going to have too much personal space and you’ll probably share a room with another’s patient. Staff is usually pretty good, but they aren’t professionals and don’t fully understand mental illness so if they say something hurtful to you try to not take it personally. Also don’t do anything that’ll make you out to be a danger to yourself.. they’ll put you on safety and you might be put on 1 on 1. Basically, just do what they say, be good, and you’ll get out sooner. Good luck
 
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Cee

Cee

cute girl
Sep 22, 2018
81
i was in intensive outpatient for a full month. i didnt stay nights but i was there about 7 hours a day and if i didnt show up the police would be called. I would have left earlier as most only stay for a week or 2, but i kept relapsing with self harm and had to be put into different therapy groups. When i got there i was given a test to assess my 'levels' of different things, asking about how sad i was, if i was drinking, having recklesss sex, all of that. We had different groups throughout the day. process group in the morning for an overall assesment, then split off with our therapists. there were 3 therapists and each had a group of us to work with. we would be in these groups for the next hour or so, this is usually when things got the most personal and 'therapy-like'. break for lunch, you had to bring your own and be monitored. Lots of other groups to be at next, art therapy, meeting with your individual therapist and psych, family therapy (mine was always over the phone). At the end of the day you had a mood assessment to be sure you wouldnt kill yourself overnight, if they ever thought you would it just took some mild persuasion to let them let u leave :) I actually enjoyed my time here, it was very open and relaxed place, i felt very safe. my therapist was great, he called me out on my bullshit and knew when i was lying, which happened often. Also met some weird kids since i was in the teen group, most of them were very nice and im still friends with now.
 
J

Jessica5

Specialist
May 22, 2019
336
TBH, I'm always suspicious of people on here who claim to have been on a medical ward. I suspect most people on here are like me and haven’t attempted suicide, either because of SI, fears of becoming a vegetable, or both.

Anyway, the only thing psych wards succeed at is making people more suicidal than they already were.
 
Rocksandsand

Rocksandsand

-
May 26, 2019
396
TBH, I'm always suspicious of people on here who claim to have been on a medical ward. I suspect most people on here are like me and haven’t attempted suicide, either because of SI, fears of becoming a vegetable, or both.

Anyway, the only thing psych wards succeed at is making people more suicidal than they already were.

I’m not trying to be provocative at all - but most suicides fail... it’s kind of more likely that people have failed and end up here than succeeded and not?
 
not_a_robot

not_a_robot

"i hope the leaving is joyful, & never to return"
May 30, 2019
2,124
TBH, I'm always suspicious of people on here who claim to have been on a medical ward. I suspect most people on here are like me and haven’t attempted suicide, either because of SI, fears of becoming a vegetable, or both.

Anyway, the only thing psych wards succeed at is making people more suicidal than they already were.

lol. at a VA unit i stole an inkpen to jam in my neck in case it got too difficult. Staff saw that I had it and looked the other way. On my way out I told my doctor "thanks for making me more suicidal" and she laughed. She kept trying to compose herself to snort out "It"s for your safety" but she was too convulsed with gleeful laughter. I went "yeah right" and walked out. Into a shelter that she knew would be way worse than the hospital.
The VA is nothing but fucking murderers.
 
PatKat

PatKat

Meh
Aug 9, 2018
980
I've only been able to find Florida and New Jersey's policies on this. In Florida and NJ, a patient is only required to pay if they have the ability to pay- at least in theory.

However, they might claim that everybody has the ability to pay. And it's not like anybody who's too indigent to pay will be able to afford a lawyer to challenge the payment.
Yea if you cannot pay expect some bills in the multiple thousands in hospital charges for an inpatient stay.
 
J

Jessica5

Specialist
May 22, 2019
336
I’m not trying to be provocative at all - but most suicides fail... it’s kind of more likely that people have failed and end up here than succeeded and not?

Most suicide “attempts” (if they can even be called that) are drug overdoses. That’s why the success rate for suicide is so low.

Anyway, I’m skeptical of how many people on here have made real suicide attempts like jumping or at least hanging.

I guess some people on here might have been thrown into a psych ward after a failed overdose, but most overdoses aren’t bad enough that you’d need to go to a hospital. Plus you can claim to the doctor that the overdose was accidental.
 
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Rocksandsand

Rocksandsand

-
May 26, 2019
396
Most suicide “attempts” (if they can even be called that) are drug overdoses. That’s why the success rate for suicide is so low.

Anyway, I’m skeptical of how many people on here have made real suicide attempts like jumping or at least hanging.

I guess some people on here might have been thrown into a psych ward after a failed overdose, but most overdoses aren’t bad enough that you’d need to go to a hospital. Plus you can claim to the doctor that the overdose was accidental.

In terms of assessing someone for an admission, the objective lethality of a suicide method isn’t really relevant. It’s more about intent. If a person believes what they are going to do/have done will kill them, that’s a suicide attempt regardless of how it pans out. At least, that’s what you’re taught as a psych nurse.
 
J

Jessica5

Specialist
May 22, 2019
336
In terms of assessing someone for an admission, the objective lethality of a suicide method isn’t really relevant. It’s more about intent. If a person believes what they are going to do/have done will kill them, that’s a suicide attempt regardless of how it pans out. At least, that’s what you’re taught as a psych nurse.

My point is that nobody will usually find out if you attempt suicide by drug overdose, since the attempt won't make you sick enough that you need to go to the hospital. Therefore, you usually won't go into the psych ward unless you tell on yourself.

Even in the off chance you get extremely sick from the drugs, you can always lie to your doctor and claim the overdose was accidental. IDK how easily they'll be able to tell it was actually a suicide attempt.
 
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