eternalpeace

eternalpeace

Student
Dec 19, 2021
140
Depression

BPD means bi-polar disorder. I think. I don't have that, I have run of the mill depression.
BPD usually stands for “Borderline Personality Disorder”, at least in Canada and the US. (There was a movement to rename it “Emotional Dysregulation Disorder”, so maybe that is what it is called in other places…) “BPD” shares similar features with bipolar disorder, in terms of extreme highs and lows. In fact, bipolar type 2 and BPD are often mistaken for each other, and there are clinicians who make entire careers out of how to spot the difference between the two, according to information from a psychologist I had. (I have had psychiatrists hotly debate whether I am BPD or Bipolar 2, or both. Once when I was in the hospital, two shrinks disagreed on this and my treating physician thought it was BPD and basically said “well, if you don’t agree, I won’t treat you, and good luck finding a Dr in this town who is taking new patients”. So I rolled with that diagnosis and did a program that didn’t help at all. On another occasion, a shrink said “if you’re BPD, I’ll eat my s***”. Ultimately it was ruled bipolar 2, with the possibility that when I was initially diagnosed (more than a decade ago) I may have displayed enough of the traits for a BPD diagnosis, but now I don’t. (Since people change, it is entirely possible to exhibit traits of a personality disorder at one time, but not another.)

You can look up the DSM criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder, and self-assess to see if you have enough of the characteristics. There are 9 personality traits/behaviours listed, and you have to have at least 5 of them to be diagnosed. It’s possible to have a few “borderline traits” without having the actual disorder. You can also have BPD alongside a mood disorder, like depression or anxiety, or other disorders like PTSD. (When I first had the BPD diagnosis, the “borderline traits” were all the clinicians wanted to talk about, and they completely missed my mood disorder, my eating disorder, and my adhd, which also shares some characteristics of BPD and there is literature on the misdiagnosis of adhd as BPD, particularly in women. There is also literature on misdiagnosing ASD and PTSD as BPD, particularly in women). I personally believe BPD has become increasingly “trendy” in the psychiatric community in the last ten years or so, and I believe it is often used as a “go-to” label for any female who is suicidal. I also find that the criteria are somewhat nebulous, and if someone wants to find “BPD”, they can characterize the facts so as to make them fit that label. I’m not saying it doesn’t exist, or that people shouldn’t seek treatment for it. On the contrary, it is very agonizing and very dangerous—I even read somewhere that it has a higher suicide rate than schizophrenia, though I don’t remember the source for that…I’m just saying that in my experience, and in that of some others with whom I have spoken, it seems like clinicians can be a bit too eager with that label. (Though I appreciate that diagnosing mental illness is very difficult, and it probably isn’t the only label that gets thrown around hastily. I just happen to know a lot about it as a result of my experience.)