thetwilightzone

thetwilightzone

-
Jul 14, 2018
307
I've wondered this. When 9/11 happened, Al-Qaeda members were crying and cheering when they knew their friends were dying by suicide. They weren't sad however, they were elated that they attacked America. Even some of the family members of the terrorists were incredibly happy that their brothers attacked the US not sad that they died.

I wonder if grief is natural as people say if some don't grieve suicide/other forms of death and others do.

People will argue that they didn't really care about them but that's not true. You don't sign up to an organisation, live with others, and entrust your safety (they knew that they could have ended up in prison) to a bunch of people you don't care about. Osama wouldn't have wired hundreds of thousands of dollars to people who he really didn't care about and thought were incapable. He clearly cared for them.

Is it because they embrace death and don't see it as a bad thing.
 
C

Couchking

~
May 29, 2018
86
They literally believe that their friends are going to their own heaven or whatever the fuck.

No different than seeing your friends going to hawaii for a holiday for them, even better maybe.

No shit they don't feel bad.

Just like the people who really believe they can fly (on drugs?) aren't afraid to jump off a building.
 
T

Throwaway563078

Experienced
Oct 6, 2018
273
If you're speaking about the Islamic terrorists or Islam in general. They're really happy when someone dies for a cause for the Islamic God and the terrorist is considered a martyr, a very high status and will immediately go to heaven that's why they are cheering.

In Islam in general, this life is considered just a test and to prepare us humans for the afterlife. It's advised to remember death often in Islam and even to visit Graves. It is definitely advised to prepare and embrace for death but mostly due to the fact that they believe in an afterlife.
 
Sayo

Sayo

Not 2B
Aug 22, 2018
520
Yes, they embrace death. They believed their friends were giving their lives voluntarily for a really honorable cause, becoming revolutionary martyrs, and were likely to be better off in heaven. You see this in other similar cases too, e.g. Yukio Mishima's right-wing militia, about whom I have posted before. While religion is a factor in your case, you can find secular examples all over the place in radical movements.

Consider the feelings of people whose children die in the military. Simplistically, some are angry, some are upset, and some are proud (for very similar reasons). Most are a mixture! The difference is that when you send your child off to war, you expect and hope that they will come back. They know death will happen, but hopefully not to them. They may become disillusioned with the cause anyway, as their kids died fighting someone else's war. Those are justifiable emotions, to be clear. In short, they have not embraced it.
 
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Throwaway563078

Experienced
Oct 6, 2018
273
They literally believe that their friends are going to their own heaven or whatever the fuck.

No different than seeing your friends going to hawaii for a holiday for them, even better maybe.

No shit they don't feel bad.

Just like the people who really believe they can fly (on drugs?) aren't afraid to jump off a building.

It's better than Hawaii for them. I mean 72 virgins, rivers of wine and honey. What a lovely unmaterialistic non male dominated heaven /religion
 
C

Couchking

~
May 29, 2018
86
If you're speaking about the Islamic terrorists or Islam in general. They're really happy when someone dies for a cause for the Islamic God and the terrorist is considered a martyr, a very high status and will immediately go to heaven that's why they are cheering.

In Islam in general, this life is considered just a test and to prepare us humans for the afterlife. It's advised to remember death often in Islam and even to visit Graves. It is definitely advised to prepare and embrace for death but mostly due to the fact that they believe in an afterlife.

So basically, be fucking crazy
 
L

lv-gras

fledermausßßßßßßßß
Jul 27, 2018
621
Yes, they embrace death. They believed their friends were giving their lives voluntarily for a really honorable cause, becoming revolutionary martyrs, and were likely to be better off in heaven. You see this in other similar cases too, e.g. Yukio Mishima's right-wing militia, about whom I have posted before. While religion is a factor in your case, you can find secular examples all over the place in radical movements.

Consider the feelings of people whose children die in the military. Simplistically, some are angry, some are upset, and some are proud (for very similar reasons). Most are a mixture! The difference is that when you send your child off to war, you expect and hope that they will come back. They know death will happen, but hopefully not to them. They may become disillusioned with the cause anyway, as their kids died fighting someone else's war. Those are justifiable emotions, to be clear. In short, they have not embraced it.


nods. suspect that they were also grieving at least somewhat, think mixed emotions is spot on here, but in public it may be easiest and seen as most appropriate to express their happiness because of the social setting, and to leave any grief for private. we may not be seeing the whole story.

as for the mixed emotions, like it is sad, but, from their point of view the person has actually helped make the world a better place and done something brave and cool. also a lot of people who get recruited for these things have issues with poverty and maybe personal problems that often lead to suffering and wishes similar to what we have here. and then they are taught wrongly that the misery around them is the fault of random people in other countries and that getting rid of them might help. so imagine ending suffering plus the opportunity to take revenge on someone thought to have caused it.

and think we mostly all understand feeing sad for people but also glad they have done something they wanted and their suffering is over here?

imagine that but you are only supposed to show the happy in public.

not saying that any of this terrorism is good, it has been warped by horrible teaching and society in this case.
 
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ParamitePie

ParamitePie

Experienced
Oct 11, 2018
218
Atheists of the postmodern westerner's worldview see death as a final destination and so they're naturally afraid of it. Ultimately, anyone with that worldview can't understand what it's like to have conviction in your beliefs. It's a cultural problem which other atheistic societies haven't suffered, and stems from a lack of beliefs in higher values or beliefs beyond the self. The vast majority of people lack the fundamental convictions that pushed Chinese Marxists to tie a suicide belt on themselves and leap at Japanese tanks, Japanese nationalists to ram planes into American battleships, national socialists of the Waffen-SS to fight as Werwolf units after the war was over, or Vietnamese farmers armed with 30-year old guns to fight against a world superpower.

On the topic of Muslims, the ummah view life as a journey and seek what lies beyond it, while most modern people seek nothing but petty pleasures in the here and now. Of course mujahidin care for those who commit shahid. They honor them, cry and miss their friends, like anyone else, but they don't grieve like western people do. First of all, their culture is markedly different in nearly every respect. Secondly, a great many of them are used to seeing people die before they even commit shahid. Finally, they believe that their friend's death was noble and virtuous, and for the highest of all causes; the service of their faith and protection of their coreligionists (something Muslims take a lot more seriously than Christians). More importantly, they know that they are embraced as the most beloved of jannah's entrants, as jannah itself lies in the shades of the mujahid's swords.

If you will, imagine you're an Iraqi. You might remember the Iran-Iraq War, and your parents definitely do. Your father probably fought in it, and you were taught to fear and loathe the Shia because of it. Furthermore, you might remember the Gulf War, when America and their crusader lackeys bombed your country to hell after Saddam tried to settle a debt dispute with Kuwait (that's how they see it). You definitely lived through the Shia and Kurdish revolts, and learned to hate them as backstabbing rebel scum. Thanks to Saddam changing tack in the 90's, you were educated in an extremely religious school, unlike your parents, and taught a far more fundamentalist version of Sunni Islam. In the 90's-00's, you probably even saw people beheaded by Saddam's paramilitary, and then America and NATO return. They annihilate Iraq for a second time on trumped up charges, kill hundreds of thousands of your people, utterly ruin your infrastructure, install a Shia puppet government (remember, you hate those guys) and kill Saddam. As if that wasn't bad enough, then you live through the insurgency, and see many more people die in the intervening 15 years.

Chances are, you won't exactly treat death the same way as a sheltered middle-class American who might've seen some of that stuff in movies or the news, but that's about it. Hence westerners cry buckets, make impassioned political debates and clog up social media about lone terrorists while people in Asia & Africa get on with their lives.
 
Justanotherconsumer

Justanotherconsumer

Paragon
Jul 9, 2018
974
I would think death would be quite attractive when the day reaches 130 degrees without air conditioning. The whole dying for Allah to kill nonbelivers icing on the cake. There is a huge poor population and unemployment probably China making everything for pennies has something to do with this.
 
Trashcan

Trashcan

Trash
Aug 31, 2018
1,234
Probably psychopaths. Psychopaths have no regard for others. They lack the ability to have empathy, remorse, guilt, and connect with others. They see others as pawns and not human beings. A lot of them take pride in their ability to manipulate other people, and think that those who can be manipulated are weak and deserve to be taken advantage of. So in their eyes those “pawns” are dead and thus no longer useful to them, so their “friends” don’t matter to them anymore.